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Essay Question #1

posted Apr 29, 2012 23:33:37 by GabyPerdomo
Why was isolationism a key adopted policy for the United States during the 1920's and 1930's?
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jonathancho402@gmail.com said May 04, 2012 03:28:19
Jonathan Cho

Why was isolationism a key adopted policy for the United States during the 1920's and 1930's?

At the end of 1919 America and Europe were exhausted from the war and its strenuous toll upon its victors and losers. Due to the economic losses and debt that the nations accumulated, the United States became less prone toward Europe. In the 1920s America entered a new prosperity full of new innovations like the car and so much more. New systems were arriving and the disillusionment of war brought a period of ‘normalcy’. America became weary of the damage from the war, and there satisfaction with their own wealth brought America to steadily isolate itself in independence in all policies.
In World War I the Treaty of Versailles settled little to nothing economically. America had lent a lot to Europe which they could no reciprocate due to their weak state. Even Germany was very weak due to the very heavy reparations it was forced to pay. Due to this America was wary of helping the European nations and did not want to enter another painful conflict. This was seen as how they cut off ties with other nations even domestically through the Immigration Quota acts that severely limited the Eastern nations. They wanted nothing to do with Europe that would involve them into another war. Economically the Hawley-Smoot Tariff devastated Europe even more through its extremely high tariff rates. The European nations were prohibited in every sense from even touching the United States due to the war’s devastating effects. The policy of normalcy also aided in their isolationism as they were tired of foreign affairs and essentially became “normal”.
Due to their prosperity the United States also did not need the help of Europe. They were booming in the Golden 20’s as everything went smoothly. They could easily contribute in the Dawes Plan that aided the European countries but only for their end benefit. They could do almost anything and this led to the possibility of high tariffs and satisfaction in normalcy for the people. This was seen when the depression finally sunk in Roosevelt finally began to open up in his policies. He even made the Lend-Lease Act and the Neutrality Acts which left economic doors open. Slowly they began to finally open up to the idea of war after their prosperity disappeared. This reveals how important their prosperity along with their fear of war is with their policy of isolationism.
Isolationism was a big policy incorporated in American during the 20s and 30s. This was largely due to the war’s effects on economy and the disillusionment of the American people.
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dakotao1441@yahoo.com said May 04, 2012 05:16:53
Miss W. Coufal

Why was isolationism a key adopted policy for the United States during the 1920's and 1930's?

Following the decimation of Europe in World War One, America was quite singular in that they lacked war torn areas of urban land and troops returned to industrial jobs, as opposed to the European nations wherein they relied upon American loans to try and jump start their economies. As opposed to more agrarian jobs, America was booming with new technologies such as commercial radio, commercially available cars, and films that contained sound to match the picture, and since Europe was unable to pay to have these technologies more wide spread, America kept the monies associated with it in their boarders. In addition, the American public wanted to remove themselves from the entangled European affairs, therefore keeping to themselves as much as possible, with a 'return to normalcy'.
First and foremost in the American mind, was the want of a 'return to normalcy'. The Great War had brought many problems with it, shortages of certain materials and food stuffs that hindered life, in addition to the millions of men that left civilian life to go fight in the war. Obviously, they wouldn't have these issues that accompanied a lost, depreciated, generation of men if Europe's problems hadn't pulled us in. Therefore, it seems to be the best option to elect President Warren G. Harding under his theme of 'return[ing] to normalcy' and staying outside of foreign affairs. To interfere in Europe's affairs, would mean having to drain more money then we have to from our economy, as well as ignore our own personal needs in favor of theirs.
In addition, unlike Europe where most of the wealthy had lost their money or the most desired goods were food stuffs, in America three main technologies became the rage and they didn't need for luxury items, unlike pre-war. The automobile began to take off more as paved roads became more common, the thriving industry became a money maker that allowed Americans to buy American luxury goods, as opposed to their former want of European goods. The radio became more common as a household fixture when commercial radio shows became a business all on their own, again demonstrating another aspect of American culture where they viewed they didn't need Europe. In addition, the -
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TeresaCwikowski said May 04, 2012 17:04:23
Teresa Cwikowski

Why was isolationism a key adopted policy for the United States during the 1920's and 1930's?

Isolationism was adopted by the United States in the 20s and 30s as a response to the war. The United States as well as Europe was devastated by the war. Resources and money were drained, and a lot of countries owed great debts to the United States. The United States government adopted isolationism because the United States and Europe were devasted by the war and the government wanted to trun away from the other countries in order to stabilize our own economy.
After the war, economies were devasted. The war had drained all of our resources, and the United States needed self-recovery time. The pressure to help the other countries combined with the large amount that was loaned to them during the war made the United States turn inward. Immigration was slowed down to 2% and the U.S. entered the Roaring Twenties, a time of great prosperity after the war.
Here entered a period of standardization, with the mass internal production of goods. Many goods that were not available before such as the car, television, and kitchen appliances were available, so people bought en mass on credit.
The American people wanted "normalcy" after the war, and this pressured the government towards isolationism. Americans went about their daily lives and consumed more than ever, despite the great poverty Europe was facing. America did not want to face Europe just after the devastation of the war, and ignored the growing problems in Germany.
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